04.02.05

The Apprentice, Week Ten: Expert Says
Lack of Sales Strategy Undermines Net Worth’s Efforts

Net Worth takes another beating during Week Ten as a result of a poor sales strategy. “The team lacks creativity and focus, skills that are critical to implementing a campaign that will drive sales,” reports Dr. Carol Dunitz, president of The Last Word, an advertising boutique that offers communication and creative services.

 

Net Worth and Magna Corp both recognize the need to give their meatball pizza a creative name. Net Worth agrees to use the name Alex proposes, “Meatball Masterpiece.” “The name has nice alliteration but little else to recommend it,” Dunitz comments. “Magna Corp, on the other hand, relies on Tana for a name. Tana has demonstrated her creativity repeatedly in other episodes including Week Nine when she led Magna Corp to a win by getting children involved decorating boxes with their hand prints.” Magna Corp decides to call its pizza ‘Manga Meatball Pizza.’ “This conjures up associations to Italy, mama, and home cooking,” Dunitz reports.

 

The objective of the Week Ten competition is to sell more pizzas than the opposing team. “Both teams need to focus on creating excitement and desire among as broad a prospect base as possible to drive sales,” Dunitz sums up.

 

Magna Corp team members Tana and Kendra aggressively sell at office buildings and small shops within a five block radius of their mobile pizza kitchen. “They are highly motivated because they have a vested interest in the outcome of their efforts,” Dunitz reports. Project manager Stephanie decides to hire attractive young models to sell for Net Worth. “This a serious mistake since it places the success of the team on a sales crew that has no real incentive to boost sales. This bad decision is compounded by the project manager’s decision to neglect Union Square, a fertile market only a block away in favor of the NYU dorms which are all but abandoned around the lunch hour,” Dunitz suggests.

 

Stephanie’s trip with Angie to Brooklyn further places Net Worth at a disadvantage. The team would have fared better if Stephanie had stayed to supervise her sales team. “Selling pizzas instead of making a time intensive trip to Brooklyn, which in no way advanced the team goal, could have given Net Worth a fighting chance to win,” Dunitz says.

 

Dr. Carol Dunitz is an author whose new communication book, ‘Louder Than Thunder: A Contemporary Business Parable,’ is about a CEO who calls in her three vice presidents to tell them she is about to step down and that one of them will succeed her. She has a riddle for them, “What is louder than thunder, as highly charged as lightning, and more powerful than the fierce North Wind?” Whoever comes back with the best answer will be the next CEO.

“Louder Than Thunder” provides significant insight on how to become a better communicator through a series of vignettes. These vignettes deal with the insights of a young person while coming of age and subsequently achieving lifelong aspirations. The reader is taken on a journey with the book’s protagonist as she learns to deal with the world around her by carefully listening and observing. In the process, the reader comes to understand how to communicate more effectively in every day interactions in and out of the workplace.

 

‘Louder Than Thunder’ has received excellent reviews in newspapers around the country as well as on the Internet. It was featured on the March 7 th cover of Publishers Weekly. Davy Rothbart, publisher of Found magazine, who provided an a dvance endorsement for the business parable writes “Carol Dunitz has crafted a fine story whose lessons extend beyond the world of business into every walk of life.”

 

Dunitz is also professional speaker who has ten programs that teach people how to communicate more effectively. She dresses in costume, sings original songs and tells stories and anecdotes that underscore the points she makes. Programs address issues including interpersonal communication, teambuilding, leadership, intercultural communication, sales and negotiating, customer service, and listening. She is the principal of The Last Word, an advertising boutique in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

 

“ Louder Than Thunder” is illustrated by award-winning artist Helen Gotlib. It is available at bookstores everywhere or at louderthanthunder.com. A recording on CD by the author as well as the learning guide are for sale at www.louderthanthunder.com.

 

 



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